Land of Sun, Wind and Water: Kazakhstan plans to increase the share of renewables in energy production

According to experts, the country has all the conditions for this – it is not in vain that Kazakhstan is called the country of the sun, wind and water.

Two years ago, near the small mining town of Saran, the largest solar power plant with a capacity of 100 megawatts was built and put into operation not only in the republic, but throughout Central Asia. 307,000 “green” panels installed on an area of ​​164 hectares convert solar energy into electrical energy. Saran is located in the heart of the Kazakh steppe. There are a lot of sunny days here even in winter.

… Work is underway on the concept of low carbon development to 2050, which provides for measures for deep decarbonization

This is not the only project – according to the Minister of Energy of Kazakhstan, Magzom Mirzagaliyev, by the middle of the century the country will cover half of its energy needs from renewable sources. But this is still a long way off: in 2020, 69 percent of Kazakhstan’s energy was generated at coal plants, and 20 percent of needs were supplied by gas. The share of renewable sources is still not more than three percent, but by 2030 it is planned to increase it to 30 percent. As indicated by the minister, over the next four years it is planned to operate projects totaling about 2.5 billion dollars.

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“Kazakhstan is currently conducting research in three areas,” Mirzagaliyev said. – First, work is underway on the concept of low carbon development to 2050, which provides for measures of deep decarbonization. Secondly, the issue of introducing an internal carbon tax on energy consumption and import and export duties is being worked out. Thirdly, work is underway to create a Carbon Fund, which will be a significant contribution of Kazakhstan to ensuring the global energy transition. ”

… the issue of introducing an internal carbon tax on energy consumption and import and export duties is being worked out

Collider Satkaliev, head of the Samruk-Kazyna Joint Stock Company, which unites major Kazakh companies, said that the transition to low-carbon development requires structural transformations in industrial production and the introduction of macroeconomic principles. “For countries with economies in transition, which account for only 10 percent of emissions of harmful substances into the atmosphere, support for the developed countries of the world is important, especially in terms of financing and exchange of experience, along with the critical role of international development institutions Satkaliev stressed.

The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe is helping Kazakhstan to reorient itself towards renewable energy sources, including under the Special Program for the Economies of Central Asia. EEC Vice-President Dmitriy Mariusin is convinced that the exchange of experiences and technologies between countries and the promotion of cross-border investments will accelerate the energy transition.

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